tumblr hit counter
hit counter αиσтнєя ∂αу ▲ ✕
Now Playing Tracks

globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.
- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”
Zoom Info
Camera
Hasselblad H4D-50
ISO
50
Aperture
f/16
Exposure
10"
Focal Length
50mm

globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.

- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

h2old:

kaajoo:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places

Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.

Source: Fast Co-Design

I want to be there

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info
thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.
Zoom Info

thescarletwindow:

The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.

I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.

We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.

I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!

I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.

The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

geometrymatters:

Walter Russell posited that the universe was founded on a unifying principle of rhythmic balanced interchange. This physical theory was laid out primarily in his books The Secret of Light (1947) and The Message of the Divine Iliad.

Russell asserted that this was mainly due to a difference in the assumptions made about the existence of mind and matter; Russell assumes the existence of mind as cause while he believes that scientists in general assume the existence of mind as effect.

Russell asserted that neither light nor heat flows from one point of space to another. He stated the same of electricity and magnetism; that neither is a flow varying as the inverse of the square of the distance according to Coulomb’s Law, but a reproduction as the inverse of the cube of space. “Light does not travel. The light and heat which appear to come from the star or the sun has never left the star or the sun. That which man sees as light and feels as heat is the reproduced counterpart of the light and of the heat which is its cause.

text: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Russell

images: https://www.flickr.com/photos/esaruoho/2357633200/in/photostream/

The Secret of Life : https://archive.org/details/WalterRussellTheSecretOfLight

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union
Flag Counter